The Reluctant Stereotypes

 

 

Formerly a band called Ens.

 

 

Martyn Bates - Vocals - replaced by: Paul King

Paul Sampson - Guitar
Steve Edgson - Clarinet

Steve Haddon - Guitar (Left after 1st single)

Chris Dunne - Drums - replaced by Colin Heanes
Mick Hartley - Bass - replaced by
Tony Wall

 

Discography: see discography page

 

More information: read the articles below

 

Lyrics: see below

Index of this page:

- Information

- Articles

- Lyrics   

 

 

 

The Label (1980, WEA)

 

1. Factory Wit

2. Side With Him

3. Back To The Greek

4. Plans For Today

5. Sunday Tears

6. Reluctant

7. Lofaska

8. Reverend Green

9. Visual Romance

10. Confused Action

11. MOD

12. The Label

Articles etc.

 

 

Asylum chic (source unknown)

 

(below photo: STEREOTYPE Paul King, modulated funk style)

 

Reluctant Stereotypes. Venue.

 

"WHY IS everyone looking so apprehensive?" asks Reluctant Stereotypes' singer Paul King in surprise, as they take the stage. It must have been intense worry that he saw on people's faces, the effort of calculating how many meals you have to forfeit in order to buy a drink at the Venue. Certainly they can't have been apprehensive at the thought of seeing the Reluctant Stereotypes perform.

 

The band has finally broken free from their restrictive 'ska' categorisation, the really blatant ska numbers such as 'Lofaska' and 'Confused Action' having been banished from the set, numbers that could have been intensely popular if put out on vinyl more smartly when they were written, in late '79.

 

Although they still plug their album verbally, that particular style has been outgrown and cast off as they've pushed ahead to where they really want to be. Their new songs are characterised by Paul King's ringing forceful voice, complemented by Steve Edgson's delicate clarinet. 

 

However, just as this melodic combination begins to soothe and lull, the senses are jolted by the return of the sharp bouncy rhythm. This basic, quirky foundation stops the melody from becoming self-indulgent - it's just refreshing! 

 

Of the new material, 'Money' bemoans the lack of, and is suitably plaintive and discordant. 'Nightmare' features haunting clarinet and a low-key reggae beat that runs throughout their music, sliding into moderated, modulated funk at times.

 

From the past material, 'Visual Romance' has been retained, the poignant tale of a man in love with a lady newscaster. The thudding bass line is the throb of desire, coupled with the pure ethereal veneer of the clarinet. This and 'Factory Wit' showcase the mime talent of Mr King as he encounters the thick glass of a tv set, or mindlessly works on an endless assembly line.

 

However, although they've shaped up musically, the Reluctant Stereotypes have slipped badly in the fashion stakes, being all dressed alike in the most unattractive garments more suitable for asylum inmates - better get smart, soonest.

 

Sharon Amos.

* Avant Skarde (source unknown)

 

Reluctant Stereotypes...

 

A great name but hardly one that trips off the tongue, but then there's nothing easy about Reluctant Stereotypes except to say that they're one of the best bans to have emerged from the Coventry explosion with more than a 50% chance of not nly surviving the boom but establishing themselves as a force for the 80's without relying on passing trends. Mike Davies reports.

 

I first encountered the band three years back at a Melody Maker contest when they were known as The Ens and played a carefully constructed yet apparently anarchic brand of free-form jazz rock while throwing in a variety of visuals that crossed the Theatre of the Absurd wih the Temperance Seven. A sort of Frank Zappa / Soft Machine / Bonzo Dog mutation of Hatfield and the North. Hard to grasp. Equally hard to assimilate at forst impression, although I was much taken with their obvious individual talent. I continued to be impressed and they continued to develop and we both continued to be impressed by the lack of favourable reaction. The next year they again enetred the contest (this time with their new name) and again reached local finals and agin I felt they shouldn't go down to the massacre. I hoped I was right but I don't think the band agreed. I think I was and in many ways this article is an explanation of faith.

 

The Ens were formed in 1974 but it wasn't until classically trained clarinetist Steve Edgson joined in '75 that they began to move in their eventual direction. At this time, they were a straight jazz-rock outfit drawing references from Henry Cow and that herd, being very intense in jumpers and jeans. Edgson felt that some sort of visual element was needed to give an easy access into the music. Influenced by Burlesque's stage approach Edgson began to shape Ens into a new presentation.

 

Their sets were invariably unpredictable... although musically they were rarely less than impressive. The sound was often uncomfortable but if ou bothered to listen it was always challenging, and worth the exploration. he shifts and subtleties of numbers like 'Arabs' , 'The Rounds' and the masterly 'Swing' has a deliberate anti-commercialism that indicated the semi-alienation approach to the audience. But you still remembered them in the dark on the way home.

 

Following the second MM rejection the band were fired into positive action and change and Edgson went down to London for advice from Oval on releasing a self-help single. Better than expected, Oval took up the single for release. It was a 3 track EP containing 'The Rounds' but the band opted for 'The Lull' as the plug side and Oval went along as an act of faith. It picked up Peel play and scored good reviews from people with two intelligences to rub together and eventually shifted 1000 copies.

 

In late 78 Paul Sampson graduated from fan to band member bringing a new, if not immediately apparent, feel to the music. Although the band continued in their jazz groove Sampson was experimenting more with white reggae - at a time when The Police had yet to make any sort of impression. "It was avant-garde reggae, more avant-skarde actually." By this time Ens had taken on a vocal attack with Martin Bates - aka Salvador Darling - who wrote the lyrics to Steve Haddon and Peter Bosworth's music.

 

Their angular anti-commercialism was stull prominent but now the musical differences in the band began to crack and the lack of success didn't help. Peter Bosworth - the guitarist - was keen to start his own studios and eventually it was a case of split Ens. This gave the chance to implemet a new approach. Steve: "Musically the development of the band went from straight jazz-rock band to a straight jazz-rock band with visuals and the second stage was when we introduced vocals for those people who didn't want to hear just instrumentals. When Peter left we decided to write music that was more commercial. We'd been the Ens for five years and we'd had a lot of problems with the name - being called the Ends, Hens, that sort of thing - whereas it actually meant a state of being, very heavy and existential. So we became the Reluctant Stereotypes in June / July 79 before the third MM contest we entered and we took the nam to sound more modern and meaningful, and it also fitted the attitudes we had to the music. When the first version of the Stereotypes split leaving Paul and I, we started from scratch and adverstised for new musicians but it was more a question of attitude that we were looking for. If someone was a great musician we still weren't going to have him if he didn't have the right attitude for the band. We wanted someone who wanted to be successful and professional and who was young with no ties. Musically anyone could improve with practice. We'd go to the rough pubs in Coventry and I'd be in a white tuxedo with a bow tie and we'd both be wearing eye make-up so people we saw knew what the band were about. Tony, the bassist, we got straight away but we had a lot of problems with the singers, some real strange people.

 

"Eventually Paul King - who sings as Winston Smith - rang us up and said he'd heard we were looking and would we like to try him. We'd actually considered Paul when we were the Ens because I'd met him in a fashionable clothes shop in town and he'd been very visually striking, but at the time his vocals weren't quite right. We did have him just sit at a table on stage, drinking a glass of wine and posing: the audience threw beer all over us. Now he's had vocal training at drama school and he's much better."

 

I reckon he's vocally individually distinctive and certainly his dramatic training has stood him in good stead as a visual presenter. In action he's an imposing and mesmerising figure adding extra emphasis to the soaring treble vocals that suddenly swoop into insidious menace. With Paul acting as a focal point visually it meant that the band can concentrate more on a hard-hitting musical delivery with a danceable directness edged against a lyrically and melodically subtle undercurrent.

 

For their debut Stereotypes single, the band recorded 'She Has Changed, Not You' with the punning instrumental flip 'Ben Shirtman'. At this stage they still hadn't got a regular drummer - (now filled by Colin Heanes) - so they brought in ex Ens Paul Brook, and since they'd yet to add King, Paul Sampson took the vocal parts. Originally the track was to be released on Horizon Studio's label but an airing on 'Rock On' brought major label interest and eventually they signed to WEA. Unfortunately due to various delays the single didn't appear when interest was at its highest to the initial impact was lost. It's a superb number with a relaxed flow to the gentle ska rhythms, full of sunshine with the lilting clarinet lifting it beyond the categories of any other ska single. Acker Bilk meets Specials?

 

The obvious response is that this is yet another coventry band following the trend. Steve: "It was a problem at the beginning and we've obviously benefitted from the Coventry scene and the interest in it but now hopefully we're going to succeed at our own level." That level's remarkably high and to set the standard they followed up with "Confused Action", another gem of a single styled similarly to the first but with sufficient difference to escape accusations of carbon copying. It too bombed out the two together selling less than the Oval release - although much of the problem stemmed from record company attitudes to the band regarding promotion on a sales level, because airplay was quite strong. Their manager has been assured the WEA regard the band as a priority album act rather than a singles outfit, and I trust they implement those assurances.

 

The third single has predictably done bugger all but 'Plans For Today' is a definite move away from the earlier releases' bounce, much more of a sultry menacing white reggae again characterised by the use of clarinet and King's vocal acrobatics. It's far more than entertaining, as is all their work. "It's music for the feet, sure, but it's music for the head too." A comment that applies to the album 'The Label'.

 

"Basically they've all got a message if you care to listen but in a live situation it's much more directly dance music. We're not a bunch of angry young men with something to say like a lot of bands appear to be, but we do want people to listen to our music and have a look at what we're doing. For people who sit down and listen to the words I think there's a lot they can identify with. We're not preaching but we are commenting for people to make up their own minds. We don't want people to follow us because of what we are or what we do, but because they understand what it's all about. The album's called 'The Label' because people feel they have to label everything before they can consider it. OK, so we call ourselves a 'pop band' but that really doesn't mean anything. So may people can't like you unless they know you're part of something.. It's the 'you've got long hair you must like heavy metal' approach. We want all sorts of people to appreciate what we do. You don't have to say, "I like the look of the Stereotypes, therefore I'm going to dress and act in a certain fashion. I suppose we could play modern pop and dress as jazz-rockers but for your own survival you can't do that, you have to look a little bit right to be accepted at all. Sadly it's general reaction both in the press and with the public that unless you look like they expect you to they don't understand what you're doing. I feel that a lot of people come to see us simply because they don't have to be tagged. People always try to label you but we're doing our best to fight back."

 

The album should make the fight easier because although it maintains an overall sound and feel the material within is quite varied. Edgson's clarinet gives it a distinctly individual edge which has already singled out the band for review praise from most papers. I've reviewed the album briefly in Buzzings so here I'd like to single out a few numbers for extra comment.

 

'Factory Wit' kicks off, a number concerned with those people who feel the need to belong to the herd. "It's about people who work in factories and use TV catch phrases all the time. A lot of people who don't have anything to say come out with some sort of mass produced identification. Steve, Paul and I (Paul Sampson) have worked in factories so it's not just an idle observation."

'Reluctant' is obviously an important number for the band philosophy. "It's just saying that people feel they have to go out wearing particular clothes ti impress people, times being led by the trends."

'Lofaska' with its Russian bass line is another pun in the Ben Shirtman vein: loafers + ska. OK. One of the best numbers is 'Reverend Green', the only remnant from Ens days, with the great line, "Lord forgive this humble sinner, he's not bad he's just a beginner". Add to that the breezy 'Side With Him' with its idiosyncratic lyric line - a feature of their work - 'Side with him countfull lost time', and the dynamite 'Visual Romance' plus the other cuts and you've got a very strong debut album. 'Sunday Tears' accentuates the jazz undercurrent to re-emphasize the levels on which the band operate and thematically it's interesting to note the overall concern for people in restrictive situations in modern life, a strong emphasis on factory life and formulated existence.

 

"I don't think you can ignore the fact that there are people in this situation, loads of people who are stuck in their factory jobs and I know how they feel and I feel for them," says Sampson. "The songs aren't about people who work in factories because I meet people who are quite happy doing what they're doing. It's purely for people like myself and Steve that don't enjoy their job and want to get out but can't because they need the money and security it brings. The reluctant stereotypes if you like. It's an observation that's all. We like people to agree but if they don't then at least it means they're happy. A lot of people need labels and we're not taking the piss out of them, but if you are a stereotype then please be aware of it." 'Be reluctant when you're being led' says the lyric.

 

Decide for yourself about the band and their music but at least be aware of them and don't dismiss them because they don't wear your own label.

 

"We see others from our streets point

Very rarely do we bother to cross the road

Safety kerbs drop sudden as our paths

reach their end

And our gutters then revealed tell us all

.......

I opened out and gave you feelings

Expressed desires and wants

You claimed to be happy to have never

known such life

But still you label was missing"

The Label.

 

* Reluctant Stereotypes article (Musicians Only, 15 November 1980)

 

The Reluctant Stereotypes can't see anything wrong with skanking in a white tuxedo. Mike Davies banishes some preconceptions.

 

If there is nothing else, the Reluctant Stereotypes still have a great name. However, there's certainly a great deal more than a snappy signature to the Reluctant Stereotypes, a five-piece outfit that are another outcrop of the Coventry new wave of ska, yet so radically different to the mainstream of the 2-Tone explosion as to create their own individual niche. They're also no soon-come arrivals, having gradually built their career over the past five years.

 

I first encountered the band three years ago at a Melody Maker contest when they were known as Ens, and was mightily impressed by their carefully structured yet apparently anarchic free-form jazz-rock music, striking use of visuals and stage effects.

 

The Ens were formed in 1974 but it wasn't until 1975 that classically trained clarinetist Steve Edgson joined the line-up to become one of the prime motivators in the progression of the Ens and now of the Reluctant Stereotypes. At this time the band were a straight jazz-rock outfit drawing inspiration from Henry Cow, Robert Wyatt and Hatfield and the North, standing still on stage blowing intensely and wearing the jeans and jumpers much beloved of the students of the form.

 

In late '78 Paul Sampson joined the Ens after being one of the loyal - if small - following the band had built up in the Coventry area. Coming straight from a long-haired jazz-rock band with influences from Zappa and the Beatles, Sampson brought a new feel to the music although it was not immediately apparent in the sound. Although the band continued in their jazz groove Sampson was experimenting more with a white reggae feel - and this at a time when Police had yet to make an impression.

 

"It was avant-garde reggae - or more avant-skarde actually because I was listening to what I always thought was reggae but wasn't actually. We never went out to play what people called ska but it turned out that way largely through a lack of knowledge. I just liked the rhythms that I heard," says Paul.

 

By this time Ens had taken on a vocal attack with Martin Bates - who went out as Salvador Darling - but the angular anti-commercialism was still prominent, albeit giving the Ens a feel somewhat like a Hatfield and the North version of the Temperance Seven. Unfortunately musical differences within the band began to crack the set-up, and the fact that the band weren't progressing in terms of success didn't help. Peter Bosworth the guitarist was keen to leave to set up his own recording studios and eventually the band just split.

 

"So we became the Reluctant Stereotypes in June / July 79 before the third MM contest we entered and we took the nam to sound more modern and meaningful, and it also fitted the attitudes we had towards the music. When the first version of the Stereotypes split leaving Paul and I, we started from scratch and adverstised for new musicians but it was more a question of attitude that we were looking for. We'd go to the rough pubs in Coventry and I'd be in a white tuxedo with a bow tie and we'd be wearing eye make-up. We'd get really weird looks, but at least it meant we got people who knew what we were about. Tony, the bassist, we got straight away but we had a lot of problems with the singer. Eventually Paul King - who sings with us as Winston Smith - rang up and said he'd heard we were looking and would we like to try him. Now we'd actually considered Paul before for an Ens line-up because I'd met him in one of the fashionable clothes shops in town and he'd been very visually striking, but at the time his vocals weren't quite right. We did have him just sit on stage with us at a table with a vase, drinking a glass of wine and posing - the audience threw beer all over us. Now with his drama work he's had voice training and he's much better."

 

Although listening to the live set there's still an obvious jazz element to the band's work, the obvious response is that there's just another ska band from Coventry jumping on the bandwagon. "It was a problem at the beginning and a quote I've always though of was 'Yes, we jumped on the bandwagon but jumped off when we realised it was running out of petrol'. Now we've obviously benefitted from the Coventry scene and the interest in it but we're hopefully going to succeed at our own level."

 

That level looks like being remarkably high and to set the standard the follow up single 'Confused Action' was another little gem, similarly styled to the first but sufficiently different to escape accusations of carbon copying. Unfortunately it too bombed out, although much of the problem appears to have stemmed from poor record company promotion and distribution because the singles received substantial airplay. WEA felt the need to sign a Coventry ska band without really understanding what the Stereotypes were or are about.

 

Hopefully now that their manager has revealed to WEA that the band are more than a contract in a file, things might change. Certainly the business itself is well interested in the band; The Specials invited them along on their seaside tourand they recently toured with Q-Tips.

 

There's a third single around which is a definite move away from the bounce of previous outings, 'Plans For Today' being a much more sultry white reggae number, again characterised by the use of clarinet and King's vocal contortions. It's entertaining but far more - "It's music for the feet, sure, but it's music for the head too". A comment that applies to the entire Stereotypes album.

 

The album's called 'The Label' because people feel they have to label everything. Well, OK, we call ourselves a 'pop band' but that really doesn't mean anything. So may people can't like you unless they know you're part of something. They need to know what they're like before they can like anything. The 'you've got long hair you must like heavy metal' approach."

 

The album kicks off with 'Factory Wit', a number largely concerned with people who feel the need to belong to the herd. "It's about people who work in factories and use TV catch phrases all the time. I don't want to put the common man down but a lot of people who don't have anything to say have to come out with some sort of mass produced identification. And Steve, Paul and I have worked in factories, so it's not just an idle observation."

 

It's interesting to note that there's overall concern for people in restrictive situations in modern living, a lot of emphasis on factory life and formulated existences. "I don't think you can ignore the fact that there are people in that situation, loads of people who are stuck in their factory jobs and I know how they feel and I feel for them. The songs aren't about people who work in factories because I meet people who are quite happy with what they're doing, it's purely for people like myself and Steve that don't enjoy their job and want to get out but can't because they need the money and security it brings them."

 

Decide for yourselves whether you like them and their music but at least be aware of the Reluctant Stereotypes. It would be a shame if they passed by without anyone noticing them. But somehow - record company willing - I don't think that's likely to happen. 

 

Lyrics

 

FACTORY WIT

(P. Sampson)

  

Factory Wit keeps a fool amused
Factory Wit creative minds abused
Factory Wit jokes about the wife
Factory Wit reflects sick sense of life

 

Oh and I wonít make the same mistakes twice
Oh please donít dictate the future of
My life, my life, my life, my life.

 

Factory Wit keeps a fool amused, amused
Factory Wit creative minds abused
Factory Wit jokes about the wife
Factory Wit reflects sick sense of life

 

Oh and I wonít make the same mistakes twice
Oh please donít dictate the future of

My life, my life, my life, my life, my life, my life
My life, my life, my life, my life.

Factory Wit, my life
Factory Wit, my life
Factory Wit, my life.

SIDE WITH HIM

(P. Sampson)

 

Side with him countfull lost days
Side with him wasted effort end to all I made
Side with him why should you stay
Side with him wasted effort end to all I made

 

Times of Love your simmering sensations brought me up
Oh so hot it wasn't worth it now your feeling's dropped
Carefully planned underhand though plain to see
Obvious choice blind to all the world but me so

 

Side with him countfull lost days
Side with him wasted effort end to all I made
Side with him why should you stay
Side with him wasted effort end to all I made

 

It makes me wonder if beauty's in the eyes of the beholder
Tell me why I find you so attractive now you're gone
Reliving thoughts never chase a woman or a bus
Sure it's true another girl could be arriving soon

 

Side with him, side with him, side with him
Side with him, side with him, side with him
Side with him, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh
Side with him, oh, oh, oh, oh

BACK TO THE GREEK

(P. King, P. Sampson)

 

Nothing changed no matter what is claimed
The dream of total harmony
The lull in which we all may share
Is threatened by oblitory

 

The universal fear to make the matter worse
Still no further have we gained
Oh still there's no new claim
And sadly now it still applies
Go back to the Greek
Ignore all nows lies

 

Go back to the Greek, go back to the Greek
Back to the Greek, go back to the Greek
Back to the Greek, go back to the Greek
Back to the Greek, we'll go

 

We look back to the time in which we first acknowledged
Humanity civility intelligence and hope
Who wrote of things then
And sadly now it still applies
Well go back to the Greek

Ignore all nows lies

Who wrote of things then
And sadly now it still applies
Well go back to the Greek ignore all nows lies

 

Oh, oh, oh, oh, wo, oh, oh, oh,
wo, oh, oh, oh, wo, oh, oh, oh
Back to the Greek, go back to the Greek
Back to the Greek, go back to the Greek

PLANS FOR TODAY

(P. Sampson)

 

Turn out the light
Set out right take the world
Hiding my selfconscious tears
Set to strike
Prospects right to unfold
Problems may soon disappear

Oh oh oh

 

Iíve got to make plans in
The morning
Making plans for today
Beware of danger
All around me
You know I cannot show my
Friends I am afraid

Oh, no, no

 

When day's wet my mind's set
To explore
Sunshine glowing in my head
Lasting debts I have yet to cure
Weakness regains lost interest

Oh, oh, oh

 

Got to make plans

I got to make plans

SUNDAYS TEARS

(P. King, P. Sampson)

 

Cry, cry, cry, cry, cry, cry, cry, cry

Sunday morning I'm sitting down
I take the papers to learn what is new
Adrian the boy marries Helga forty four
The milkman gave more than pintas at the door
Actor tells of his love of ex-wives
They all still love him well what a strange life
The dirge goes on
Published as new and every Sunday repeats the new

 

The ghost in the bar who tickles the maids
The dole queue scrounger thats really getting paid
The driving instructor collecting more than money
Rapist victims, black magic become funny
The dirge goes on published as new
And every Sunday repeats the news
The dirge goes on published as new
And every Sunday repeats the news

 

The dirge goes on published as new
And every Sunday repeats the news
The dirge goes on published as new
And every Sunday repeats the news

 

But sad is the truth when the numbers are counted to realize
Millions read what is spouted by the dirt peddlers who
Contribute this filth they sell it is news deceivers of truth
Sensationalist pouter's wo the Sunday doubter
Whatelse can we do sensationalist pouter
To the Sunday doubter whatelse can we do
But cry.

Cry, cry, cry, cry, cry, cry, cry, cry etc.

 

 

RELUCTANT

(P. King, P. Sampson)

 

Stand up speak impress your friends

lead this cause and make amends
For the times you were lead by all the trends
Individual but no way single trying his theories on
New to mingle desire to be a one on his own

 

Here we are and trapped by what they say we are

or feel we are

Though reluctant we follow on in stereotype without a fight

 

Scream out loud a force to attack is met by laughter
From men at the back hopelessly he buttons his latest mac
Combs his hair the modern way reads his Guardian every day
A lot there but nothing much to say

 

He's trapped by ways which show him the way to go
He doesn't know though redundant his mind is not in
Stereotype he feels this right

 

Here we are and trapped by what they say we are

or feel we are

Though reluctant we follow on in stereotype without a fight

 

False illusion as if we're alone practising by the mirror at home
For coming over as a one on our own
They make us think things from their heads too late to realize
We're been led how to get out and which way is best
We're not alone we'll prove this yet lets be who we are with no
Regrets, grab our lives and take what is best

Be reluctant when being led

 

Be reluctant when you're being led
Be reluctant when you're being led

LOFASKA

(P. Sampson)

 

Lofaska!

REVEREND GREEN

(P. King, P. Sampson)

 

I try an' try to sort my life sir never really knowing
Where I gone wrong sir you see I have this problem
Sir it coming out of sexual frustration
I haven't the heart to tell my mum sir
I've tried to tell my dad but he is too dumb sir

 

Lord forgive this humble sinner he's not bad he's just
A beginner his thoughts only need to come cleaner
He promises to try if you'll only give him time to
Change and sort out his minds pervertions
To give him the chance to give back the stolen panties
To wipe his slate clean at the marital aid shop

 

No more telling the kids about his puppy dogs or
Sneaking glimpses at his nextdoor neighbour
Watching the girls on the hockey pitch
Or in the gym etcetere, etcetera

 

Reverend Green just smiles sympathetically though secretly
His stomach turns to jelly hearing the gory details
Of perverted sexual acts and other naughty stories too

 

He just looks, nods, all over the place periodically
Almost as if he can really see

 

Does this mean I'm completely clean sir
My mind can go on its way never fearing
Indecent perversion taking over me
Making me dirty, only God can see
That I mean all well

VISUAL ROMANCE

(P. King, P. Sampson)

 

Poor John walked into the room and quietly sat down
He pushed the button by his side and the screen burst into life
A smile emerges on his face as they began another night
Oh just a visual romance a highlight of his life
Another visual romance which gave him a life

 

He watched her read the world today his mind kissed her thin
Lips jealously he eyes the microphone heaved upon her chest
They meet for just brief periods but he sees her every night
Oh just a visual romance John's laying on his back
Another visual romance with no physical contact

 

He loves her so, he needs her so, but he knows he has no chance
For stopping him from loving her is quarter inch thick glass

 

He hugs nylon cushion as she wishes all goodnight
Her eyes look shyly to the ground as he strokes her smooth
Dark hair, a kiss receives the cushion
And his mind floats to the sky
Just a visual romance a dream up in the skies
Another visual romance with no promises or lies.

CONFUSED ACTION

(P. Sampson)

 

For three years he worked for them,
taken for granted, a helping hand
Days of services weeks of pain
A waste of time he start again

 

He may not know what he wants,
he only knows what he ainít got
Chance to reason time to prove
Show the world what he can do

 

Makes me feel so pure and wise,
give him my thoughts and some straight advice
Confused action, nothing gained
A waste of time he start again

 

He may not know what he wants,
he only knows what he ainít got
chance to reason and time to prove
confused action born to lose

 

All at once life seems so fresh,
full of adventure and full of strength.
Path now there once in his head
I know he never listened to a word I said

 

He may not know what he wants,
he only knows what he ainít got
Chance to reason and time to prove
Confused action, born to lose

 

Time to prove, to prove
Confused action
Time to prove, to prove

M.O.D.

(P. King)

 

The pitch of blackness is this night
or maybe a dream
Lurking through this form makes a figure
Theft his theme
A stealer of futures
of what may have been
Martin unaware unfeeling
simply takes what is seen

Play our music for the thieves of dreams
Portland Road of Norfolk Street
you've taken what we love
Martin O'Neill you stole our hopes
Mr. Douglin you've brought our futures down

Come morning and daylights sharp reality
His results effects finally take hold of me
I make it home, I sit on the phone and cry
Did you read the news Martin. No!
Another life.

Where were you Mr. Douglin
when the news was broke
To see their faces crack fragment
into a thousand hopes
To hear their deep sighs,
all their dreams no crashed
All of this Mr. Douglin just make you
some petty cash

 

 

THE LABEL

(P. King, P. Sampson)

 

We see others from our streets points
Very rarely do we bother
to cross the road
Safety kerbs drop sudden
as our paths reach their end
And our gutters then revealed tell us all

I opened out and gave you feelings
Expressed desires and wants
You claimed to be happy
to have never known such life
But still your label was missing

I offered everything I had
Holding out on nothing except your name
But still contented you were not
To set your heart at ease,
to let others know your position
Required a simple word

Pathetic how labels content those who want
Strange how we strive for our freedoms
Then oppress our own gains
by the craving for labels
For the need to know what others may call us

I opened out and gave you feelings
Expressed desires and wants
You claimed to be happy
to have never known such life
But still your label was missing

NIGHTMARES

 

Footsteps echo in a cold dark alley way
A figure in the distant shadows
Moves my way
Unrested mind awake in sleep
Hide my head beneath the sheets
Nightmares recur again.

 

Running home I swiftly stumble up the path
Closely followed by this image of the dark
My door is locked thereís no escape
The latch lifts on my garden gate
Nightmares recur again.

 

No need for a key the door creeks open wide
Trembling I see a face with bloodshot eyes
Warm in sweat though cold and weak
Half awake relieved I shriek
Nightmares recur again

The nightmares recur again.

Nightmares
recur again
Nightmares
recur again.

SUBWAY

 

Donít walk in the subway angel
For they are dark and forebearing
Donít talk in the subway angel
At least not to one you donít know

Donít smoke in the subway angel
The smoke may blow in your face
When they ask for a light my dear
Thatís when the subway goes dark

 

Strange is the twist
That looms at them now these tunnels
Created for life are now the channels
Of violence and fear to avoid
Like the child and the knife

 

Go play in the subways darling
Laughs the disciple of fear
Go pouce on the tunnel sacrifice
For that is their fate tonight

Go take from the subway chancers
What comes to the child and the knife
Go to your task you controllers of fate
Of the lemmings who run to the light

 

All lyrics are property and copyright of their respective owners


 

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